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Questions


Is there bunting allowed in Majors? (1/20/2012)
Is there an Infield Fly Rule in Majors? (1/20/2012)
What are the base running rules for Majors? (1/20/2012)


 

Answers

Is there bunting allowed in Majors?
Yes, bunting is allowed?

Is there an Infield Fly Rule in Majors?
Yes, there is an Infield Fly Rule for the Majors Division.

Infield Fly Rule

  • Official Playing Rule 2.0 “Definitions – Infield Fly” addresses the Infield Fly Rule. For ease of reference, an Infield Fly is a fair ball (not including a line drive nor an attempted bunt), which can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort, when first or second, or first, second and third bases are occupied, before two are out. When it seems apparent that a batted ball will be an Infield Fly, the umpire shall immediately declare, “Infield Fly” for the benefit of the runners. Per Official Playing Rule 6.05(d), the batter is out when Infield Fly is declared. The ball is alive and runners may advance at the risk of that ball being caught, or retouch and advance after the ball is touched, the same as on a fly ball. If the hit becomes a foul ball, it is treated as same as any foul ball.



What are the base running rules for Majors?

Stealing Bases

  • Official Playing Rule 7.13 addresses stealing bases.  Note that runner or runner(s) on the base paths (except for a runner already on third base) are allowed to continue to advance at their own risk until the pitcher is in contact with the pitcher’s plate (and in possession of the ball) and the catcher is in the catcher’s box.  See examples1 through 5 listed below.
  • Leadoffs are not allowed
  • Base runners cannot leave their bases until the ball has been pitched and has crossed home plate (One warning will be given, however the base runner is never out for leaving early.)
  • Double steals ARE allowed.
  • Dropped 3rd strike is in play.  With no one on base, the batter may continue to run all the way to 3rd base at his own risk, but may not score and has to be locked down at 3rd base.  If runners are on base and dropped 3rd strike happens, batter may advance as far as he can.  The baserunners ahead of him can advance at their own risk, but must stop at third base.
  • Stealing home is NOT allowed.


Runners Advancing Bases When Ball Is In Play In The Field

  • If the ball has been hit into the field, the ball is considered live.  Any plays made on a runner attempting to advance to any base that a runner is on or advancing to from a live ball hit into the field will allow any runner to advance to any base (including home) at the runner’s own risk.
Examples

 

    • Runners at first and third.  When the pitcher pitches the ball, whether the catcher catches it or it is a passed ball, the runner at third may not advance.  The runner at first base may attempt to steal second base at the runner’s own risk after the ball crosses the plate.  If the catcher throws the ball to second base in an attempt to throw the runner out, the runner at third base still may not attempt to steal home.
    • Runners at first and second base.  When the pitcher pitches the ball, whether the catcher catches it or it is a passed ball, the runner at second base may attempt to steal third base at the runner’s own risk after the ball crosses the plate.  The runner at first base may also attempt to steal second base.
    • Bases loaded.  The pitcher pitches the ball and the catcher misses it (passed ball).  Because the runner at third base may not advance (must be hit in or walked in), no other runners may advance either.
    • Runner at second base.  The pitcher pitches the ball and the catcher catches is.  The runner may attempt to steal third base at the runner’s own risk after the ball crosses the plate.  If the catcher attempts to throw the runner out at third and overthrows the third basemen, the runner must remain at third base.
    • Runner at first base.  The pitcher pitches the ball and the catcher catches it or misses it (passed ball).  The runner may attempt to steal second base at the runner’s own risk after the ball crosses the plate.  If the catcher attempts to throw the runner out at second base and overthrows the fielder covering the base, the runner may attempt to advance to third base.  If the fielder attempts to throw the runner out at third base and overthrows the third basemen, the runner cannot advance home.
    • Runner at first base.  The pitcher pitches the ball and the catcher misses it (passed ball).  The runner may attempt to steal second base at the runner’s own risk after the ball crosses the plate.  If the catcher cannot locate the ball, the runner may attempt to advance to third base.  If the catcher attempts to throw the runner out at third base and overthrows the third basemen, the runner cannot advance home.
    • Runner at first base.  The pitcher pitches the ball and the batter hits a line drive into the gap in left-center.  The runner on first attempts to advance to third base while the batter-runner attempts to advance to second base.  If the fielder attempts to throw the batter-runner out at second base, the runner who was advancing from first to third can attempt to advance home at the runner’s own risk.  If the fielder attempts to throw the runner out at third base and overthrows the third basemen, the runner who was advancing from first to third can attempt to advance home at the runner’s own risk.  If a play is made at home, the batter-runner who safely arrived at second base may attempt to advance to third base at the runner’s own risk.